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newsbeastlabs:

Tracking the presidential groundgame
As the two presidential campaigns launch into their final throws, we wanted to see who had the biggest footprint of campaign headquarters across the country. The map above ran with the resulting story showing Obama with a large advantage, especially in swing states. We thought getting from idea to map / chart would be as easy as checking the candidates’ websites or calling their press offices to request a full list. Not quite.
Finding Romney’s offices
Governor Romney’s campaign didn’t get back to our requests so we dug into their website. Romney only had volunteer offices in 16 states, each of which has a web page and a map showing office locations. Here’s Ohio’s. The data that powers the map is visible if you look at the Javascript files that power it, so we copied the data sixteen states into one file and saved it. They were in JSON file format — but more on that later.
Finding Obamas’s offices
President Obama has offices in many more states than Romney so going state by state is more of a hassle and his campaign’s website doesn’t have the same convenient state-by-state maps. Instead, you input your zip code and it gives you a map of all locations within forty miles of you. 
Needless to say, getting a comprehensive list by canvassing the country in 40 mile chunks was out of the question. Digging again into the javascript that powers the website (aside: the Obama website has some slick ASCII art in their source code), their volunteer center finder works by sending out a query that looks like this http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/10011/ with your zip code making up the those last five digits. If you put that in your browser and hit return you’ll see the centers closest to the Daily Beast offices in Manhattan.
It automatically looks within 40 miles of you but if you add “?distance=1000” at that url, it will search within however many miles you want. 
So if you add the zip code for the rough geographic center of the US, Lebanon, Kansas and a distance of 10,000 miles you get something that looks like this:
http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/66952?distance=10000
which will give you a list, in JSON again, of every volunteer center in the country.
This list returns a lot of information we didn’t immediately need, though, like hours of operation and email address contacts. We wrote an R script that took just the fields the we needed for our map, mostly the latitude and longitude, city, and state and made a clean spreadsheet in CSV format.
From there we were able to do counts by state and plot them on a map. Once we had the final count, the Obama campaign confirmed that our number was in the right ballpark.
BONUS: Obama’s offices all include a Foursquare ID. If you want to play around with them, here’s the data, right click and choose “Save Links As…” if it doesn’t download automatically. Some interesting things could be finding the mayors of the obama campaign offices, which location has the most check-ins, check-ins over time in different locations etc. — let us know at newsbeastlabs@gmail.com and we’ll put up your stuff.

newsbeastlabs:

Tracking the presidential groundgame

As the two presidential campaigns launch into their final throws, we wanted to see who had the biggest footprint of campaign headquarters across the country. The map above ran with the resulting story showing Obama with a large advantage, especially in swing states. We thought getting from idea to map / chart would be as easy as checking the candidates’ websites or calling their press offices to request a full list. Not quite.

Finding Romney’s offices

Governor Romney’s campaign didn’t get back to our requests so we dug into their website. Romney only had volunteer offices in 16 states, each of which has a web page and a map showing office locations. Here’s Ohio’s. The data that powers the map is visible if you look at the Javascript files that power it, so we copied the data sixteen states into one file and saved it. They were in JSON file format — but more on that later.

Finding Obamas’s offices

President Obama has offices in many more states than Romney so going state by state is more of a hassle and his campaign’s website doesn’t have the same convenient state-by-state maps. Instead, you input your zip code and it gives you a map of all locations within forty miles of you. 

Needless to say, getting a comprehensive list by canvassing the country in 40 mile chunks was out of the question. Digging again into the javascript that powers the website (aside: the Obama website has some slick ASCII art in their source code), their volunteer center finder works by sending out a query that looks like this http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/10011/ with your zip code making up the those last five digits. If you put that in your browser and hit return you’ll see the centers closest to the Daily Beast offices in Manhattan.

It automatically looks within 40 miles of you but if you add “?distance=1000” at that url, it will search within however many miles you want. 

So if you add the zip code for the rough geographic center of the US, Lebanon, Kansas and a distance of 10,000 miles you get something that looks like this:

http://offices.barackobama.com/postal_code/66952?distance=10000

which will give you a list, in JSON again, of every volunteer center in the country.

This list returns a lot of information we didn’t immediately need, though, like hours of operation and email address contacts. We wrote an R script that took just the fields the we needed for our map, mostly the latitude and longitude, city, and state and made a clean spreadsheet in CSV format.

From there we were able to do counts by state and plot them on a map. Once we had the final count, the Obama campaign confirmed that our number was in the right ballpark.

BONUS: Obama’s offices all include a Foursquare ID. If you want to play around with them, here’s the data, right click and choose “Save Links As…” if it doesn’t download automatically. Some interesting things could be finding the mayors of the obama campaign offices, which location has the most check-ins, check-ins over time in different locations etc. — let us know at newsbeastlabs@gmail.com and we’ll put up your stuff.

The jobless rate dropped in Ohio and five other states where President Obama and Mitt Romney are concentrating their campaign battle, according to Labor Department data |http://bloom.bg/S2y09n  INTERACTIVE: Explore more data on the economic health and political status of the U.S. with our State-By-State visualizer |http://bloom.bg/RwdrSB

The jobless rate dropped in Ohio and five other states where President Obama and Mitt Romney are concentrating their campaign battle, according to Labor Department data |http://bloom.bg/S2y09n
  
INTERACTIVE: Explore more data on the economic health and political status of the U.S. with our State-By-State visualizer |http://bloom.bg/RwdrSB

futurejournalismproject:

Source
The Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project has launched Source, a repository of “journalism code” and articles about it.
For example, there’s currently Ruby client for interacting with the New York Times’ campaign finance API and a Guardian Javascript library to manage data behind client-side visualizations.
As OpenNews lead Daniel Sinker describes it on his Tumblr:

Through feature articles that dig into the specifics of the code and the motivations that behind it, through an index to open code repositories produced by the journo-code community, and an index to that community itself, Source connects the many lines of code that make up journalism today with the people that write them. We’ve built relationships between code, people, and organizations deep into the data models of Source because we know that code is always a reflection of the individuals that create it and that those individuals combine to create a thriving community.

Source: Journalism code and the people who make it.

futurejournalismproject:

Source

The Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project has launched Source, a repository of “journalism code” and articles about it.

For example, there’s currently Ruby client for interacting with the New York Times’ campaign finance API and a Guardian Javascript library to manage data behind client-side visualizations.

As OpenNews lead Daniel Sinker describes it on his Tumblr:

Through feature articles that dig into the specifics of the code and the motivations that behind it, through an index to open code repositories produced by the journo-code community, and an index to that community itself, Source connects the many lines of code that make up journalism today with the people that write them. We’ve built relationships between code, people, and organizations deep into the data models of Source because we know that code is always a reflection of the individuals that create it and that those individuals combine to create a thriving community.

Source: Journalism code and the people who make it.

reuters:

The Reuters Elections 2012 portal has relaunched just in time for Wednesday evening’s presidential debate. View campaign ads, the latest polling figures, a look back at how we voted over the past few decades, opinion and analysis and the latest news from the campaign trail.

Tonight’s Presidential Debate will be live blogged on the portal

REUTERS ELECTIONS: The latest news and analysis from Reuters.com

(via soupsoup)

wnyc:

30 Issues in 30 Days looks at foreclosure in America. Check out the map of foreclosures by county, over the last five years. Here.
-Jody, BL Show-

wnyc:

30 Issues in 30 Days looks at foreclosure in America. Check out the map of foreclosures by county, over the last five years. Here.

-Jody, BL Show-

Why is access to data important? You get up in the morning, you’re getting ready for work and you ask, should I take the car or the Metro? Should I take the highway or drive on surface streets? Luckily, the local transportation agency is giving out data. Imagine how much more frustrating it would be if you didn’t get a traffic report or a subway system alert at all? Imagine how disastrous it would be if public safety officials didn’t know where emergencies were happening?
Chris Wu, in her White House Safety Datapalooza data journalism talk (via copyeditor)

(via lifeandcode)

wnyc:

ICYMI: New Yorkers donating much more to Romney and conservative Super PACs than to President Obama…
Interactive map of high-dollar NYC donors to Obama and Romney + Money Talking podcast: Why Has Wall Street Abandoned President Obama for Mitt Romney?

wnyc:

ICYMI: New Yorkers donating much more to Romney and conservative Super PACs than to President Obama…

Interactive map of high-dollar NYC donors to Obama and Romney + Money Talking podcast: Why Has Wall Street Abandoned President Obama for Mitt Romney?

Little blog about journalism, technology, and data.

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