journo-geekery:

How does Wikipedia deal with a mass shooting? A frenzied start gives way to a few core editors » Nieman JLab

Analysis by Brian Keegan, post-doctoral comp sci research fellow at Northeastern, also posted on his own blog.  Both copies of which are fascinating:

3,262 unique users edited one or more of these seven articles, 222 edited two or more of these articles, 60 had edited 3 or more, and a single user WWGB had edited all seven within the first 48 hours of their creation. These editors are at the center of Figure 7 where they connect to many of the articles on the periphery. The stars surrounding each of the articles are the editors who contributed to that article and that article alone (in this corpus). WWGB is an editor who appears to specialize not only in editing articles about current events, but participating in a community of editors engaged in the newswork on Wikipedia. These editors are not the first to respond (as above), but their work involves documentingadministrative pages enumerating current events and mediating discussionsacross disparate current events articles. The ability for these collaborations to unfold as smoothly as they do appears to rest on the ability for Wikipedia editors with newswork experience to either supplant or compliment the work done by amateurs who first arrive on the page.

Aside:  I don’t like grabbing so much from another site’s post—apologies if it seems too much.  I couldn’t decide which graph best conveyed the breadth of analysis for this post. I figured a slideshow was best for helping readers make the biggest comparisons and—hopefully—link through to both the post and to Mr. Keegan’s research.

journo-geekery:

What Could Disappear - NYT

Maps show coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded, without engineered protection, in three levels of higher seas. Percentages are the portion of dry, habitable land within the city limits of places listed that would be permanently submerged.

These are some of the more drastic inundation  at the worst case scenario in the options provided.  I highly recommend you try out the different settings and survey the cities.

datanews:

Quick shout out to our @datanews folks and the entire @WNYC digital team for our fantastic election-night map and coverage, particularly to Data News interaction designer Louise Ma who pulled together so much information into such a beautiful page. More posts on the plumbing behind the maps coming soon.

Delayed reblog, but worth mentioning!

datanews:

Quick shout out to our @datanews folks and the entire @WNYC digital team for our fantastic election-night map and coverage, particularly to Data News interaction designer Louise Ma who pulled together so much information into such a beautiful page. More posts on the plumbing behind the maps coming soon.

Delayed reblog, but worth mentioning!

Union Metrics has created a great visualization tool that shows the top tags in Tumblr posts and reblogs about the election in real time.

Union Metrics has created a great visualization tool that shows the top tags in Tumblr posts and reblogs about the election in real time.

(via dailydot)

jfkeefe:

oreillyradar:

In the video above, Michael Flowers speaks at DataGotham 2012 about how New York used data to reduce ambulance response times by a minute. (Hat tip Fred Berenson.)

Earlier this year, Flowers explained how predictive data analytics is saving lives and taxpayer dollars in New York City.

Flowers will be sharing more of his “moneyball for government” experiences at Strata New York this fall.

One of the most inspiring talks I’ve seen about data to action.

(via feeling-data)

The definitive comment on @fivethirtyeight and the election result comes from xkcd - of course.
via @TimHarford

The definitive comment on  and the election result comes from xkcd - of course.

via 

nytgraphics:

Shift map, 11:21 PM

Best election interactive by a mile

nytgraphics:

Shift map, 11:21 PM

Best election interactive by a mile

journo-geekery:

512 Paths to the White House:  “Select a winner in the most competitive states below to see all the paths to victory available for either candidate.”

Shan Carter and Mike Bostock lay out Election Night in Alexander-Calder’esque flowchart form.  (Perhaps a mobile of these scenarios will help the anti-Silverdork pundits out there.)

(Apologies to followers for perhaps overposting NYT stuff.  The team is doing such great work in this Election and year I can’t help but share it.)

This is fantastic

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